facebook twitter blog Pinterest

Connecting Flight

February 14, 2012 by  
Filed under Julie Davidson

By Julie Davidson

We hear a lot about how different we are. Politics, race, religion, economic status. But when it comes to women, it seems that we always find a way to connect.

Recently, we had a 3½-hour trip home from California, and I was planning to sleep. Actually, I was planning to sit in between my boys and keep them from fighting and dream about sleeping. But as it turns out, there was another mom of two boys who sat behind us. You can already see where this is going.

I think we first talked about health issues. And we were quite chatty and probably not super quiet. So there is a good chance that everyone from first class to 10 rows behind us knows that I am a nervous flier.

Of course we talked about our husbands. Like my husband, hers is a middle school teacher. We both understood the frustration of budget cuts and the beauty of summers off.

We both live in the Midwest. And we both want out of the Midwest. We had been through the same blizzard last year and agreed that when the snow is taller than your kids, winter loses its luster.

I was telling her that recently a friend of mine sent me a purse that had a horse riding theme and the proceeds go to help retired and rescued horses. What do you know? She owns and rides horses!

I don’t know what religion this woman was. I have no idea whom she will vote for. But I do know that was one of the fastest 3½-hour flights I have ever been on. As we walked to baggage claim, my seven-year-old asked me, “Are you friends with her, Mom?” I don’t remember what my answer was, but I do know that I made a connection with her. And what a nice lesson to teach our kids. That no matter what, we generally have more in common with people than not. And for women, kids give us that. Kids and chocolate.

Comments

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!





*

The information on MommyMDGuides.com is not intended to replace the diagnosis, treatment, and services of a physician. Always consult your physician or child care expert if you have any questions concerning your family's health. For severe or life-threatening conditions, seek immediate medical attention.