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Nasopure

June 20, 2014 by admin  
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Logo Mommy MD Guides Recommended Product RMommy MD Guides-Recommended Product

If you’re bothered by nasal congestion, a simple patented system called Nasopure can help. Developed by Mommy MD Guide Hana R. Solomon, MD, Nasopure is the modern, comfortable, and easy nose wash that cleans away mucus as well as pollen, mold, dust, bacteria, and viruses.

nasopureTo use Nasopure, simply add the Nasopure swish sticks salt mixture (buffered and pharmaceutical grade) in the patented Nasopure bottle. Flush the solution into your nose, and it will exit the opposite nostril, leaving you clean and refreshed. It’s so easy, even a two-year-old can do it.

Dr. Hana’s Nasopure contains an 8-ounce bottle, 20 swish stick salt packets, and instructions and offers 100 percent satisfaction guaranteed. It was developed by a pediatrician, using a mother’s wisdom.

For more information and to order, visit www.Nasopure.com.

MD MOMS

January 4, 2016 by admin  
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“I really LOVE the MD MOMS lotions, sunscreen, and bath wash,” says Shilpa Amin-Shah, MD, a mom of a son and two daughters and an emergency medicine physician at Emergency Medical Associates, in St. Johns, FL. “The smell of the of bath wash is soothing and pleasant. The sunscreen wipes are wonderful. We recently brought them on vacation and they are truly the most water resistant sunscreen I have ever encountered. Even when the children were done swimming in the pool and I was giving them shower afterwards, I had to use a soapy washcloth to remove the sunscreen from their skin. My baby (13 months) has very sensitive skin and she had no reaction to the sunscreen and no sunburn!  I highly recommend this product!”

Product MD Moms-Start Kit“The MD MOMS creams have nice scents and nice packaging,” adds Hana Solomon, MD, a mom who raised four children, a grandmom of three, a pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter, in Columbia, MO. “The smell of the of bath wash is soothing and pleasant. I felt comfortable using them on my grand babies and they enjoyed the applications!”

You can buy MD MOMS products at www.mdmoms.com, www.scsdirectinc.com; amazon.com and specialty retailers across the country.

 

Cheski Socks

October 2, 2015 by admin  
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Logo Mommy MD Guides Recommended Product RMommy MD Guides-Recommended Product

 

Cheski Socks are designed by a mom to stay put on baby’s kicking feet. Their design features strategically placed elastic to keep socks in place, a knee sock design to keep little shins warm, and a cotton blend for baby’s comfort.

“The socks were deliciously soft, cozy, and the perfect length to protect the knees,” said Hana Solomon, MD, a mom who raised four children, a grandmom of three, a board-certified pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter, and the maker of the most comfortable nose wash in the world for children, Dr. Hana’s Nasopure nasal wash system, in Columbia, MO www.Nasopure.com. “I would buy these socks in a heartbeat for any new baby. They are awesomenesProduct Cheski Socks 2s, heaven, and lovely gifts for babies!”

You can buy Cheski Socks at www.cheskisockcompany.com, in baby boutiques across the United States, on amazon prime, and on uncommongoods.com. A 3-pack retaiProduct Cheski Socksls for $15.99 and singles retail for $5.99.

For more information, visit www.cheskisockcompany.com

Exclusive for Mommy MD Guides readers: Use code MOMMYMD25 at checkout to save 25 percent at their web store.www.cheskisockcompany.com

We received sample(s) of Cheski Socks in exchange for our honest opinions. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we use personally and believe will be good for our readers. 

Maximizing Your Hairstyle

March 8, 2013 by admin  
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How do you keep your hair looking great?

Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: I’ve learned it’s best to work with your natural hairstyle, rather than against it. You should accept who you are. I have naturally curly hair, and I’ve always had haircuts that allow me to wash it and go. My hair pretty much looks the same all of the time. I never have a bad hair day unless I’ve slept on it for three weeks without a shower.

Since I had a bout with cancer, I’ve stopped dying my hair. I’m fine with the gray. First, I’m not 40 anymore and I don’t want to try to look like someone I’m not. Second, the chemotherapy really damaged my hair, and I don’t want to put any more chemicals on it.

My husband always says, “I love you for who you are.” You don’t need another color hair. I won’t make you a nicer, better, smarter person.”

Hana R. Solomon, MD, a mom who raised four children, a grandmom of three, a board-certified pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter, in Columbia, MO

Changing Your Mindset

March 8, 2013 by admin  
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How do you change your overall mindset?

Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply:

I’ve learned that in any situation, what’s important is attitude. When you’re very busy as I was at the end of my pregnancy, still operating on patients at 38 weeks, hunting for a new home, and running around trying to get everything ready for my baby to be born–it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and exhausted.

But if you commit to keeping a positive mindset and thinking of everything as fun, you can find a way to enjoy all the numerous tasks that must be done. Luckily my husband is also a great partner in that he brings joy to everything we do and go through together instead of getting stressed out. Focusing and getting overwhelmed in the negative only slows you down and makes every second drag out even longer. Therefore, in the challenging, busiest times in life, I focus on what’s good, fun, and positive, rather than dwelling on what’s bad, unpleasant, and negative.

Catherine Begovic, MD, a mom of a six-month-old daughter and a plastic surgeon at Make You Perfect, Inc., in Beverly Hills, CA

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Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: My parents were Holocaust survivors, and we were very poor. We only ate meat once a week, and I put cardboard in my shoes to cover the holes in the soles. I always would pray no one would walk up the stairs behind me in school and see the holes in my shoes!

Despite all of our struggles, my mother taught my sister and I to remember how lucky we are. She taught us to think, We have a warm place to live, and we have the opportunity to work. My mother really pounded into our heads how lucky we are. Nothing is owed to use, we have to earn it. And we have to make our own happiness.

Hana R. Solomon, MD, a mom who raised four children, a grandmom of three, a board-certified pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter, in Columbia, MO

Allergies and Asthma

February 22, 2012 by admin  
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How did you treat your toddlers’ allergies and/or asthma?

Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: My youngest child had asthma and was admitted to the hospital with pneumonia each year of his life until age five. It was a scary time. I could manage him at home to a point, and then he would need to be admitted for dehydration or steroids.

It was really important to find out what my child was allergic to and then avoid that as much as possible. As he grew older, the infections lessened and his allergies did improve. I would say that many children have reactions to foods, pets and chemicals in our environment, and we do not even know what they are! If you know a good allergist, that is a blessing. Once a child with allergy issues is exposed to viruses on top of that, the child can quickly develop a bad illness.

I tried to make sure all my kids were sleeping well, ate a well-balanced diet and minimized their stress. I acted quickly when I noticed they were congested from a cold or getting overtired to help prevent complications from an upper respiratory infection turning into ear infections or worse. We had a steam shower, and I would put the kids in swimsuits so we could sit together in the steam room. I would try to lavage their noses with saline but that was more challenging.

Laura M. Rosch, DO, a mom of a 12-year-old daughter and 7-year old boy/girl twins, a board-certified internist who works at Central DuPage Hospital Convenient Care Centers in Winfield, IL, and an instructor in the Department of Family Medicine at the Midwestern University/Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine, in Downers Grove, IL

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Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: My kids had seasonal allergies. I addressed the problem by cleaning up the environment. I removed as many carpets as possible in our home and replaced them with washable floors. I removed as many fabric curtains as reasonable and replaced them with washable blinds. I covered the mattresses and pillowcases with allergy covers. I kept pets out of the bedrooms. (No exceptions!) I also kept the furnace filters clean.

Then we cleaned up our diet. I bought organic foods, avoided processed artificial foods, and tried to rotate foods. Back then not many people believed in a relationship between foods and allergies and asthma, but now it is proven. Allergies to fish, nuts, milk, pork, and other foods are well known.

In addition to cleaning our home environment and cleaning up our diet, I also would wash my child’s nose. I understood that allergy/asthma episodes always began with a snotty nose, so washing it made sense. Now we know that rinsing with the correct solution will remove 80 percent of the allergens!

Cleaning the environment and the diet and the nose help decrease the toxic load on the body.

Hana R. Solomon, MD, a mom who raised four children, a grandmom of three, a board-certified pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter, in Columbia, MO

Talking, Delayed

February 21, 2012 by admin  
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I’m concerned my two-year-old isn’t talking yet. How did you cope with this?

Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply:

I noticed pretty early on that my son wasn’t as verbal as my daughter had been as a toddler. At the time, I kept thinking, He’s such a good, quiet baby! I wasn’t really worried about it.

When I took my son to his two-year-old well baby visit, the pediatrician told me that he hadn’t hit a milestone and that we should look into it. I didn’t take it very seriously. But I did follow through on the evaluation. It took about six months to go through the proper steps to have my son’s speech evaluated, but we did then find out that something was wrong.

I encourage parents that if their child’s pediatrician suggests checking into something, do so right away. If I had ignored her suggestion and hadn’t pursued it, we would have been behind the eight ball when my son started school. If you check into it, and everything comes back normal, that’s great! But if there’s a problem, it’s better to get help sooner rather than later.

My son received special speech services until first grade, and now he’s all caught up with his peers.

Ann V. Arthur, MD, a mom of a 10-year-old daughter and an eight-year-old son, a pediatric ophthalmologist in private practice at Park Slope Eye Care Associates, in New York City, and a blogger at www.waterwinetravel.com

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Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: During my kids’ toddler years, the lack of verbal skills typical for this age presented a challenge. I tried to focus by helping them develop their language skills. When my toddlers tried unsuccessfully to communicate something to me, I would make eye contact, clearly verbalize what I thought they wanted or needed, and I repeated a single word.

For example, if my son was throwing a fit because he wanted a snack, I’d say, “Please, snack, please.” When he expressed anything with good vibes, I’d say, “Yes, you may have a snack, please and thank you. Good work using your words, please, snack. Johnny said please snack, good work.”

We parents must remember to be patient with toddlers because they understand so much more than they are able to communicate. We must also remember to be consistent in encouraging verbal communication, and of course have patience during the learning process. Don’t forget to show appreciation for any genuine attempt from your toddler.

Hana R. Solomon, MD, a mom who raised four children, a grandmom of three, a board-certified pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter, in Columbia, MO

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Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: One of the hardest things about toddlers is that they want to be independent and do things by themselves, but they can’t communicate that yet. I found the best way to help my toddlers was to be patient and try to communicate with them on their level by giving them choices and using a lot of pointing to supplement their words. Another thing that helps is to keep in mind that your toddler will be talking soon, and then he’ll be talking nonstop.

My oldest three children were all late talkers. When my oldest daughter was 18 months old, she only spoke a couple of words. She wasn’t really putting any words together into sentences yet. That was concerning.

I talked with her pediatrician about it at her two-year checkup. She connected us with Early Intervention, and my daughter received speech therapy for about a year. The therapist came to our home once a week, for about a half hour each visit.

I learned a lot of very helpful things by watching the therapist, and I was better able to help my younger daughter and sons to learn to talk. For example, we’d play games that involved naming things, and any time I could name an item, I did.

Sometimes parents put off talking with their pediatricians about speech delays. But I think it never hurts to at least call them and have an evaluation done.

Kristie McNealy, MD, a mom of nine- and six-year-old daughters and four-year-old and 22-month-old sons and a blogger at www.KristieMcNealy.com, in Denver, CO

Products for Pregnancy

July 10, 2011 by admin  
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Logo Mommy MD Guides Recommended Product RWhat products do doctors who are also mothers use during their own pregnancies and births? Read about Mommy MD Guides-Recommended Products for Pregnancy, including:

Too Much Sleep

February 6, 2011 by admin  
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My baby is seven weeks old and seems to be sleeping twice as much as she is awake. When she is awake, she is alert and doing everything she should be. But I worry, is she sleeping too much? Will it negatively affect development?–Mary D, a mom of one in West Warwick, RI

Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: Your baby is sleeping the perfect amount. In fact, a good sleeper makes for a wonderfully content baby. In my experience, good sleepers are the ones that are on the upper end of height/weight charts. Not to worry as long as baby is doing what a seven-week-old should be: eating, gaining weight, making eye contact, and getting  her neck stronger.  

Hana R. Solomon, MD, a mom of four,  ages 35 to 19, a board certified pediatrician, the president of BeWell Health, LLC, the inventor and entrepreneur of Nasopure Nasal Wash systems, and the author of Clearing The Air One Nose At A Time, Caring For Your Personal Filter

 

Colds and Chicken Soup

October 5, 2010 by admin  
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Does eating chicken soup really help prevent colds and flu?—Margaret Knaack, a mom of one in Zoar, OH

Our Mommy MD Guide’s reply: People have been catching colds since the beginning of time—and for just as long, we’ve been trying to cure them. In spite of our best efforts, the common cold remains one of the most frequently acquired illnesses in the world.  

If you’re like most adults, you can expect to catch a cold two to four times each year. With each infection, you’ll likely spend around eight to 10 days coughing, sniffling, sneezing and generally feeling miserable.  

Colds occur when one of over 200 types of microscopic viruses invades the cells of the nose and throat. The viruses may be tiny, but they’re practically indestructible.  

The benefits of chicken soup aren’t just legendary; they’re also scientifically proven. Besides being a soothing comfort food, chicken soup can help relieve nasal congestion and soothe irritated airways. In a study conducted in the 70s in Florida, researchers found that chicken soup eased nasal congestion better than both hot and cold water. They think the heat of the soup helps to make your nose run, possibly reducing the amount of time that the cold germs stay in your nose and helping you to get better faster.  

Another benefit to chicken soup is the chicken itself. It contains an amino acid called cysteine, which is similar to a drug called acetylcysteine that doctors prescribe to treat bronchitis and other respiratory infections.  

Yet one more benefit of chicken soup lies in the fact that it’s mainly liquid. Most doctors urge their patients to drink more fluids to get over a cold, and drinking the both in chicken soup is a great way to do that.  

I always keep cans of chicken soup in my kitchen and give it to my kids if it looks like they’re getting sick. I also always keep the ingredients on hand to make homemade chicken soup, including a whole chicken in my freezer, in case we really get sick.  

Rallie McAllister, MD, MPH, MSEH, a mom of three sons, family physician, and coauthor of The Mommy MD Guide to Pregnancy and Birth  


Mommy MD Guide-Recommended Product 

 

Dr. Hana’s Nasopure 

If you’re bothered by nasal congestion, a simple patented system called Nasopure can help. Developed by Hana R. Solomon, MD, Nasopure is the modern, comfortable, and easy nose wash that cleans away mucus as well as pollen, mold, dust, bacteria, and viruses. 

To use Nasopure, simply add the Nasopure swish sticks salt mixture (buffered and pharmaceutical grade) in the patented Nasopure bottle. Flush the solution into your nose, and it will exit the opposite nostril, leaving you clean and refreshed. It’s so easy.

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The information on MommyMDGuides.com is not intended to replace the diagnosis, treatment, and services of a physician. Always consult your physician or child care expert if you have any questions concerning your family's health. For severe or life-threatening conditions, seek immediate medical attention.